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Published On:Monday, August 21, 2017
Posted by CDS

An Invention That Turns Seawater Into Drinking Water

MANCHESTER – Researchers in UK have achieved a major turning point in the quest for efficient desalination by announcing the invention of a graphene-oxide membrane that sieves salt right out of seawater.
At this stage, the technique is still limited to the lab, but it’s a demonstration of how we could one day quickly and easily turn one of our most abundant resources, seawater, into one of our most scarce – clean drinking water.
The team, led by Rahul Nair from the University of Manchester, has shown that the sieve can efficiently filter out salts, and now the next step is to test this against existing desalination membranes.
“Realisation of scalable membranes with uniform pore size down to atomic scale is a significant step forward and will open new possibilities for improving the efficiency of desalination technology,” says Nair.
“This is the first clear-cut experiment in this regime. We also demonstrate that there are realistic possibilities to scale up the described approach and mass produce graphene-based membranes with required sieve sizes.”
Graphene-oxide membranes have long been considered a promising candidate for filtration and desalination, but although many teams have developed membranes that could sieve large particles out of water, getting rid of salt requires even smaller sieves that scientists have struggled to create.
One big issue is that, when graphene-oxide membranes are immersed in water, they swell up, allowing salt particles to flow through the engorged pores.
However, the Manchester team overcame this by building walls of epoxy resin on either side of the graphene oxide membrane, stopping it from swelling up in water.
This allowed them to precisely control the pore size in the membrane, creating holes tiny enough to filter out all common salts from seawater.
Not only did this leave seawater fresh to drink, it also made the water molecules flow way faster through the membrane barrier, which is perfect for use in desalination.
The ultimate goal is to create a filtration device that will produce potable water from seawater or wastewater with minimal energy input.
There are already several major desalination plants around the world using polymer-based membranes to filter out salt, but the process is still largely inefficient and expensive, so finding a way to make it quicker, cheaper, and easier is a huge goal for researchers.
Thanks to climate change, seawater is something we’re going to have plenty of in the future – Greenland’s coastal ice caps which have already passed the point of no return are predicted to increase sea levels by around 3.8 cm (1.5 inches) by 2100, and if the entire Greenland Ice Sheet melts, future generations will be facing oceans up to 7.3 metres (24 feet) higher.
But at the same time, clean drinking water is still incredibly hard to come by in many parts of the world – the UN predicts that by 2025, 14 percent of the world’s population will encounter water scarcity. And many of those countries won’t be able to afford large-scale desalination plants.
The researchers are now hoping that the graphene-based sieve might be as effective as large plants on the small scale, so it’s easier to roll out.
The research has been published in Nature Nanotechnology.

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Posted by CDS on August 21, 2017. Filed under . You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Feel free to leave a response

By CDS on August 21, 2017. Filed under . Follow any responses to the RSS 2.0. Leave a response

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